PCIJ LAUNCHES LOSING PARADISE SERIES

Indigenous and local communities in Palawan fight for their land and oppose mining operations despite government promises of “sustainable development". This series is a collaboration between the PCIJ and the NBC News in the US with support from THE PULITZER CENTER'S RAINFOREST INVESTIGATIONS NETWORK.

 

PALAWAN AUTHORITIES REZONE FOREST TO ALLOW MINING

A nickel mine is on the brink of major expansion in Mt. Bulanjao, a rainforest system considered by indigineous people as their ancestral home and protected by a conservation law. 

'I'M SPEAKING SINCERELY. WHERE DOES THE GOVERNMENT STAND? WITH THE SMALL PEOPLE OR DO THEY FAVOR THE BIG ONES?'

 

KENNEDY CORIO, MEMBER OF THE PALA'WAN TRIBE IN BATARAZA, PALAWAN

 

UNSAFE LEVELS OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FOUND IN RIO TUBA WATERWAYS

What was once a natural source of water has become a place that Palaweños stay away from. Residents worry that a nickel mine's plan to expand would contaminate other waterways.

 

'REGULATORS SHOULD BE OUR WATCHDOGS.... OKAY, YOU CLEAN YOUR BACKYARD, BUT SOMEBODY HAS TO MAKE SURE THAT CLEANING IS ALSO CORRECT.'

 

LYNN CRISANTA PANGANIBAN, TOXICOLOGY PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES - MANILA

 

RISE OF ELECTRIC CARS THREATEN PHILIPPINE FORESTS

 The transition to clean energy is pressuring mineral-rich countries like the Philippines and nickel mines like Rio Tuba Mining Corp. to dig more.

 

'GIVEN MINING'S ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS AND THE HAZARDS PRESENT IN THE PHILIPPINES, A DEVELOPMENT PARADIGM BASED UPON LARGE-SCALE MINING IS AN EXAMPLE OF DIGGING TO DISASTER.'

 

WILLIAN HOLDEN, GEOLOGY PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY

 

MORE PCIJ STORIES ON THE ENVIRONMENT